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China was so worried about London supporting the Hong Kong protests it kidnapped a young employee of the British consulate, abused and threatened him, and then lied about it.

These are the tools and techniques of the Chinese Communist Party’s foreign policy today.

A fully updated and expanded edition of our acclaimed book on China’s growing use of disappearances, The People’s Republic of the Disappeared, goes on sale today (November 1).

On November 1, 2019, Safeguard Defenders is releasing the second edition of its acclaimed book ‘The People’s Republic of the Disappeared’, available worldwide on Amazon and other online bookstores, as both paperback and Kindle ebook.

Chinese police are moving away from TV broadcasts and using short video platforms, microblogs and targeted screenings to air forced confessions.

(2) UPDATE as of 19 October 2019: Nikkei Asian Review reports that a Japanese professor at Hokkaido University has been detained in China. The unnamed man is in his 40s, and was detained in Beijing earlier in September while travelling in China. The reports states it is the first Japanese person classified as a civil servant that has been detained in China. It is believed he is detained related to Espionage charges.

Today is the International Day of the Disappeared; a day that marks the countless victims of state-sponsored enforced disappearances around the world.

No country has such a terrifying network of systems designed to disappear critics today as China.

Court case number: Ö 2479-19.

This post provides details from the Swedish Supreme Court’s verdict today ruling that Chinese fugitive Qiao Jianjun should not be extradited to China. The full verdict is only available in Swedish (available here). Read the Supreme Court’s summary in English here.

In a landmark case, Sweden’s Supreme Court on July 9 ruled against the extradition of one of China’s most sought after corruption suspects.

Qiao Jianjun, a Chinese Communist Party member and mid-level state official, is being pursued by Beijing under its Operation Fox Hunt program for returning fugitives from overseas. Qiao is suspected of embezzling funds back home.

Sweden held Qiao in detention for nearly a year, until the Supreme Court held a hearing on 18 June following which Qiao was freed, pending a decision.

China’s state TV has been responding vigorously behind the scenes to five complaints against it made between November 2018 and April 2019 by Safeguard Defenders and victims to UK broadcasting regulator Ofcom for airing forced confessions.

 

 

Update (May): Former CCTV presenter Cui Yongyuan, who first brough attention to scandal at the Chinese Supreme Court, which led to Supreme Court Justice Wang Linqing's disapparance (later re-appearing in a forced TV confession on CCTV, before disappearing again), has offered a similar confession himself. Cui posted on his social media account a handwritten notice about how he trusts the official investigation team, and that he had been foolish to believe what judge Wang had told him. 

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